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Intellect

Kening Lu to receive Distinguished Teaching Award, deliver lecture Nov. 30

The Distinguished Teaching Award from the Department of Mathematics at Brigham Young University will be presented on Thursday, Nov. 30, at 4 p.m. in 1170 Talmage Math Sciences/Computer Building

Kening Lu will receive the award and will deliver a lecture on “Dynamical Behavior of Differential Equations.” A reception will be take place in the hallway next to the lecture room at 3:30 p.m.

The Distinguished Teaching Award was established by a gift from Carolyn Savage Wright and the Kenneth C. Savage Foundation as a tribute to teachers in the BYU Department of Mathematics. Recipients must demonstrate teaching effectiveness, influence in teaching beyond their own classrooms and the ability to foster curiosity and excitement about mathematics in their students.

The associate chair of graduate studies in the department, Lu received the BYU Karl G. Maeser Award for research and was a co-founder of the Math Circle program at BYU, which provides exciting math to instruction elementary and middle school students.

For more information, contact David Wright at (801) 422-4027.

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