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Intellect

KBYU-TV series Jan. 26-28 will help Utahns with substance abuse problems

KBYU-TV, Channel 11, will air special programming designed to help individuals and families in overcoming substance abuse Monday through Wednesday, Jan. 26-28, at 8 p.m.

Prescription medication overdoses kill more Utahns than automobile accidents and are one of the leading causes of death for Utahns 25 to 54 years old. Viewers will learn more about preventing and overcoming abuse of both legal and illegal substances, including those local resources that can help addicts take control of their lives and help families deal with the effects of addiction.

Representatives from several local organizations will be in the KBYU-TV studios to help fellow Utahns, including the Edward G. Callister Foundation and BYU’s College of Health and Human Performance. They will discuss the latest methods used in the fight against substance abuse. Themes include:

· Monday: The Science of Addiction and Prescription Drugs

· Tuesday: Treatment

· Wednesday: Prevention

A complete listing of programming available on KBYU-TV is available at www.kbyutv.org or by calling 1-800-298-5298.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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