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Intellect

Julie Bevan Reed to present BYU faculty cello recital Oct. 1

Brigham Young University School of Music faculty member Julie Bevan Reed will perform a faculty cello recital Friday, Oct. 1, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

Admission is free and open to the public.

"There is a decidedly autumnal theme to this recital, but there is also a theme of pieces that are 'old friends' and ones that are 'new faces' to me," Bevan Reed said.

The recital includes pieces by Ernst Bloch, Paul Hindemith, Johannes Brahms, Robert Cundick, Gabor Lisznyai, Gabriel Faure and Johnny Mercer.

Cundick was a professor in the School of Music when Bevan Reed attended BYU. She studied counterpoint with Cundick.

She will be accompanied by her husband, Douglas Reed. He has worked in musical theatre for the last 30 years, including on Broadway as a pianist and conductor.

Bevan Reed received a master's of music degree from the University of Southern California. She has performed with a variety of orchestras including the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Chicago String Ensemble, Storioni Ensemble and Omaha Symphony. She is currently coordinator of the string division and chamber music program at BYU.

Writer: Rebekah Hanson

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