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Intellect

Juliana Boerio-Goates to deliver BYU Distinguished Faculty Lecture Feb. 28

Juliana Boerio-Goates, a professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Brigham Young University, will present the Karl G. Maeser Distinguished Faculty Lecture—the university’s highest faculty honor—during a forum assembly Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 11:05 a.m. in the Marriott Center.

Live broadcasts will be available on KBYU-TV (Channel 11), BYU-Television, KBYU-FM (89.1), BYU-Radio and byubroadcasting.org, as well as on campus in the Joseph Smith Building Auditorium and the Varsity Theater in the Wilkinson Student Center. Rebroadcast information is available at byubroadcasting.org.

Boerio-Goates joined the BYU faculty in 1982 and has since taught chemistry classes from the introductory to graduate level. She has also served as associate dean of General and Honors Education and as associate director of the Center for Improvement of Teacher Education and Schooling.

The author of several technical papers and co-author of two technical books, Boerio-Goates has received many teaching awards from professional organizations for her research efforts. Her research is directed toward understanding the factors that give rise to phenomena in crystalline solids.

She received a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Seton Hill College in Greensburg, Pa., and master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Michigan. She has also conducted post-graduate work at Argonne National Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Oxford University.

Her husband, Steven R. Goates, is also a professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

Writer: Brian Rust

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