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Intellect

Jordanian Supreme Court Justice to discuss "Islam and Terrorism" Sept. 29 at BYU

Jordanian Supreme Court Justice Karim Pharaon will give a lecture Friday, Sept. 29, at 3 p.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building at Brigham Young University. The title of his lecture will be "Islam and Terrorism."

Justice Pharaon received his law degree in 1972 from Damascus University in Syria. He managed the legal affairs at Bendix Field Engineering, a contractor to the U.S. Corps of Engineers, in Saudi Arabia and Yemen from 1975-1982. He then started his own private law practice in Amman, Jordan and worked there from 1982-2000. During this period he represented many International and national firms, corporations and individuals.

In January of 2000 he was appointed as a judge at the Court of Appeals, Amman , where he presided a panel until June of 2004, when he was appointed at the Court of Cassation in Amman, Jordan.

Since May 2005 Justice Pharaon has been a member at the Supreme Court of Justice of Jordan.

Justice Pharaon has participated in drafting many laws that were submitted to the Jordanian Parliament and International entities such as the World Health Organization (WHO).

For more information, contact Erlend Peterson at (801) 422-1802.

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