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Intellect

Japanese scholar to discuss colonial politics Dec. 5 at BYU

Jin Makabe, a Harvard-Yenching Institute visiting research fellow, will present “A Genealogy of Japanese Colonial Policies: The Views of Christian University Scholars” Friday, Dec. 5, at noon in the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies conference room, 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

Makabe is an associate professor in the Graduate School of Law and Politics at Hokkaido University in Japan, specializing in Japanese intellectual history from the 17th to the 20th century.

At Harvard, he is studying the how the Japanese regarded China’s dynastic government in the 17th and 18th centuries, examining the political backdrop and intellectual transformations that took place during the late Ming and early Qing periods.

Makabe’s first book “Politics and Academia in Late Tokugawa Japan: Shōheizaka Confucians and Diplomatic Transformation” won the Tokugawa Memorial Foundation’s prize in 2008 for the best academic book on early-modern Japanese history.

This lecture will be archived online. For a complete schedule of David M. Kennedy Center events, visit kennedy.byu.edu. For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652 or lee_simons@byu.edu.

Writer: Brady Toone

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