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Intellect

Israeli scholar to discuss aftermath of 9/11 in March 2 lecture at BYU

Gideon Aran, a visiting Israel professor from the University of California-Berkeley, will be speaking about the aftermath of 9/11 in a lecture at Brigham Young University Wednesday, March 2, at noon in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

Aran’s presentation is titled “Almost Ten Years after Sept. 11: Just Another Comment on Fundamentalism.” Admission is free and the public is welcome to attend. 

A Scholion Scholar at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Interdisciplinary Research Center in Jewish Studies, Aran is also the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Visiting Israeli Professor at Berkeley. His main topics of academic interest are radical religion, religious violence in comparative perspective, terror, past and present manifestations of extremist Judaism, and Israeli culture and political culture.

He received a doctorate in sociology and anthropology from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

This lecture is hosted by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies at BYU and will be archived at kennedy.byu.edu/archive. For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652 or lee_simons@byu.edu

Writer: Philip Volmar

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