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Intellect

Hugh Nibley topic of Lee Library lecture March 19

The House of Learning Lecture Series scheduled for Wednesday (March 19) at 2 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium at Brigham Young University will feature author Boyd Petersen.

Peterson will discuss his biography on Hugh Nibley, a widely recognized scholar on The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. While writing the biography, Petersen had complete access to Nibley's journals, personal correspondence, notes and papers.

Petersen is married to Nibley's daughter, Nina Nibley Petersen, and teaches at both BYU and UVSC. He is also working on a doctoral degree from the University of Utah.

After receiving an undergraduate degree in French and international relations from BYU, he worked for the U.S. Congress for eight years in the House, Senate and Congressional Research Service. He then received a master's degree in comparative literature from the University of Maryland.

The House of Learning Lecture Series, hosted by the library, aims to provide a forum where professors, students, and staff can openly discuss ideas. For more information, contact Brian Champion at (801) 422-5862.

Writer: Liesel Enke

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