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Intellect

H. Dennis Tolley to speak at BYU devotional May 13

Brigham Young University statistics professor H. Dennis Tolley will be featured at a BYU devotional Tuesday, May 13, at 11:05 a.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

The devotional will be broadcast live on KBYU-TV (Channel 11), KBYU-FM (89.1), the BYU-Television and BYU-Radio satellite networks and at broadcasting.byu.edu. The devotional will also be rebroadcast Sunday, May 18 on KBYU-FM at 8 p.m. and Sunday, May 25 at 6 and 11 a.m. on KBYU-TV and on BYU Television at 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Tolley received his doctorate in biostatistics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his bachelor's degree in statistics from BYU.

He is pursuing many research interests. Since 1994, he has worked with LDS Health Study combining data on the morbidity and mortality experience of Utahns and LDS church members. He has also worked on the CINDI Project with the World Health Organization developing tools for statistical analysis of a large set of noncommunicable disease data from more than 15 countries.

Tolley is also working on the ANEMIA study for WHO, analyzing combined data from more than 300 studies of anemia in women.

He is also working for the Utah County Assessors Project, and has developed a statistical model for appraising property in Utah County.

Writer: Elizabeth B. Jensen

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