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Intellect

Guest artist Neil Rutman to give free BYU piano recital Sept. 15

Guest artist Neil Rutman will perform a free piano recital at Brigham Young University Thursday, Sept. 15, at 7:30 p.m. at the Madsen Recital Hall.

The recital will be preceded by a lecture at 7:15 p.m. Rutman's recital will celebrate the bicentennial of Franz Liszt's birth. The program will feature Liszt's Petrarch Sonnets and the epic 25-minute Sonata in B Minor — the grandest of Liszt's works. Additional pieces by Rameau and Prokofiev will also be included.

Rutman graduated from the Eastman School and Peabody Conservatory and is the artist-in-residence at the University of Central Arkansas where he also coaches the boxing team.  He is a top prize winner in several international piano competitions and has performed on concert tours throughout the United Kingdom, Europe, New Zealand, Japan and the Persian Gulf.

This summer Rutman gave the closing concert at the World Conference of the European Piano Teachers Association Conference in Serbia. Rutman is also a contributing author for the book, “Piano Masterpieces,” published by Oxford University Press in June 2011.

For more information about this recital, contact Ken Crossley at (801) 422-9348 or ken_crossley@byu.edu. To learn about Rutman, view his DVDs on YouTube or visit www.neilrutman.net.

Writer: Charles Krebs

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