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Intellect

French ambassador to U.S. visits BYU campus for lecture March 24

His Excellency Pierre Vimont will discuss “French-AmericanRelations in Today's World” on Monday, March 24, at 3 p.m. in the Assembly Hallof the Hinckley Alumni and Visitors Center at Brigham Young University.

President Nicolas Sarkozy appointed Vimont Ambassador ofFrance to the United States on Aug. 1, 2007. He previously served as chief ofstaff to the French minister of foreign affairs (2002-07) and as ambassador andpermanent representative of France to the European Union (1999-2002).

After joining the Foreign Service in 1977, Vimont was firstposted to London as secretary from 1978-81. He then worked with the Press andInformation Office at the Quai d'Orsay for the next four years.

Vimont studied at the Institute of Political Studies and theNational School of Administration, where he received his law degree.

Writer: David Luker

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