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Intellect

Family Christmas traditions explored at Lee Library lecture Dec. 9

Kristi Bell, Brigham Young University folklore archivist, will speak Thursday, Dec. 9 at 3 p.m. in the Special Collections' DeLamar Jensen Lecture Room as part of this semester's Omnibus Lecture Series, sponsored by the L. Tom Perry Special Collections.

Bell's lecture, "My Mother Makes Us Pajamas for Christmas: Family Traditions for Strong Families" discusses what holiday traditions mean.

"Our stories and traditions tell us who we are and how we fit into our family," says Bell. "They emphasize what is important to us. The patterns, traditions, stories that we share within our families create a unique family spirit."

Bell will share stories gathered by the Wilson Folklore Archives about Christmas, family togetherness and traditional gifts.

As a curator of the Wilson Archives since 1995, Bell has given many professional and community presentations. Her research focuses on family narratives and Mormon courtship customs.

For media inquiries, please contact Kristi Bell at (801) 422-6041, Kristi_bell@byu.edu or Mike Hooper, communications manager of the Harold B. Lee Library at (801) 402-6687, mike_hooper@byu.edu.

Writer: Mike Hooper

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