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Intellect

Erin D. Bigler to deliver annual Hickman Lecture March 26 at BYU

Brigham Young University’s College of Family, Home and Social Sciences will host the 16th Annual Martin B. Hickman Outstanding Scholar Lecture, “The ‘Enchanted Loom’: MRI, the Developing Brain and Autism” by Erin D. Bigler, Thursday, March 26, at 7 p.m. in 250 Spencer W. Kimball Tower.

A BYU professor of psychology and neuroscience, Bigler established the Brain Imaging and Behavior Laboratory at BYU. He has served as chair of the BYU Psychology Department and holds a diploma in clinical neuropsychology from the American Board of Professional Psychology.

After receiving his doctorate degree in physiological and experimental psychology from BYU, Bigler received postdoctoral training at the Barrow Neurological Institute of St. Joseph's Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona. After teaching at universities in Texas, he joined the BYU faculty in 1990.

Bigler has been a licensed psychologist since 1975. His research interests cover a broad spectrum of neurologic and developmental diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease.

The annual lecture honors Hickman, who joined the BYU faculty in 1967 and was named dean of the College of Social Sciences in 1970. In 1980, he was responsible for restructuring the College of Social Sciences and parts of the College of Family Living.

For more information, contact Kim Reid at (801) 422-1320.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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