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Intellect

Employees can correct their own missed punches on Y-Time

The BYU Payroll Office has announced that employees can now correct many of their own missed punches, when necessary. This will save employees and Y-Time managers time and improve the accuracy and speed of payment for all hours worked.

All hourly employees will have the benefit of fixing selected time exceptions – those that occur within the current pay period plus those from the previous pay period. Y-Time users will have the opportunity to correct the following exceptions:

  • missing In-punch,
  • missing Out-punch,
  • duplicate punches.

At the completion of each pay period, employees with exceptions will receive an email with a link to their timesheet. To begin, click on the link and then click on the “Previous Period” at the top of the Timesheet. The exceptions that can be self-corrected will be highlighted.
We encourage you to be mindful of your time worked; periodically review your timesheet; self-correct the allowable exceptions; and communicate with your Y-Time manager regarding any remaining exceptions. (Time managers will receive a report of all modifications made to the timesheet by employees.)

These self-corrections must be completed before the end of the current pay period. Employees will not be paid for days where exceptions occur until all exceptions on that day are resolved. As a reference, we have included on the right two screenshot examples of what you might see. (Click on them to see details. The gray box will show the editable/self-correctable cell.)

For more information see ytime.byu.edu.

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