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Intellect

Elder Dallin H. Oaks to speak at BYU devotional Nov. 9

Elder Dallin H. Oaks, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, will speak at 11:05 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 9 in the Marriott Center at a Brigham Young University devotional.

Live broadcasts of the devotional will be available on KBYU-TV (Channel 11), BYU-Television, KBYU-FM (89.1), BYU-Radio and byubroadcasting.org, as well as on campus in the Joseph Smith Building auditorium and the Varsity Theater in the Wilkinson Student Center.

Rebroadcasts will be Sunday, Nov. 14 on BYU-Radio at 6 a.m. and 4 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 21 on KBYU-TV at 6 a.m. and 11 a.m., on BYU-Television at 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. and on KBYU-FM at 8 p.m. Archives will be available at www.byubroadcasting.org.

A member of the Quorum of the Twelve since 1984, Elder Oaks recently returned from the Philippines, where he served as area president.

Prior to his call to the apostleship, Elder Oaks was the president of BYU for nine years, a justice of the Utah Supreme Court for four years and a professor at the University of Chicago Law School for 10 years.

Elder Oaks graduated from BYU in 1954 and from the University of Chicago Law School in 1957. As a young lawyer, he served for a year as a law clerk to Chief Justice Earl Warren of the United State Supreme Court.

For media questions, please contact Cecelia Fielding, (801) 422-4377.

Writer: Devin Knighton

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