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Intellect

Education Week Aug. 21-25 will bring thousands to BYU campus

Brigham Young University will host the 84th annual Campus Education Week, "Seek Learning," Aug. 21-25 at locations throughout the BYU campus.

Education Week—possibly the largest single-event continuing education program in the world—is co-sponsored by BYU and the Church Educational System of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It will host 1,100 classes this year (including more than 80 youth classes and a youth dance) ranging from topics such as gardening, dance and muzzle-loading artillery, to religion, human relations, finance and law. The program includes 178 returning faculty along with 59 new presenters.

This year's theme, "Seek Learning," was taken from D&C 88:118, "…seek ye diligently and teach one another words of wisdom; yea, seek ye out of the best books words of wisdom; seek learning, even by study and also by faith."

The Education Week devotional will feature Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of the Church on Tuesday, Aug. 22, in the Marriott Center at 11:10 a.m. This free devotional is open to the public and is titled "Truth Restored."

Participants can register for the week, a single day or part of a day, with early registration offered at about a 20 percent discount from the at-the-door rate. Registration rates and other information are available at the Education Week Web site, educationweek.byu.edu, and registration may be completed by telephone, Internet, mail or in person.

Volunteer hosting is once again available and provides free tuition for participants, with shifts on four consecutive days. Participants must be 18 years or older. For questions, contact (801) 422-8012.

In an effort to serve a larger audience, the Church satellite network and KBYU-TV (Channel 11 in Utah) will broadcast 12 presentations by speakers such as John Bytheway, Richard N. Holzapfel and Victor L. Ludlow. The broadcasts will run on BYU-TV from Sept. 12-15, and on the Church satellite from Oct. 10-13.

Parking will be available around the LaVell Edwards Stadium, the Marriott Center and other areas designated on the map provided with the Education Week mailer available on request. For further lots, there is a shuttle service that runs Tuesday through Friday of the week and drops participants off at designated locations on the mailer map. Use of public transportation and carpooling is encouraged.

Construction will affect the area around the Jesse Knight Building, the area just northeast of the Tanner Building (the future site of the Gordon B. Hinckley Alumni and Visitors' Center) and one street just east of the Marriott Center.

For more information, contact the Education Week office at (801) 422-8012.

Writer: Brooke Eddington

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