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Intellect

Economic self reliance topic for BYU conference Nov. 8-9

“Building Economically Self-Reliant Families” will be the topic of Brigham Young University’s annual Economic Self-Reliance Conference, to be held Thursday and Friday, Nov. 8-9 at the BYU Conference Center.

Seating for the conference is limited. For more information and to register, visit selfreliance.byu.edu.

The conference provides an opportunity for practitioners, researchers and sponsors to learn, discuss and network. Workshops include education for economic self-reliance, micro-franchising innovations and implementation, self-reliance for Utah single mothers and ESR and Utah families. There will also be a banquet to honor the social innovator of the year.

In 1998, the faculty and students of BYU’s Marriott School of Management sponsored a conference focusing on the microenterprise movement, called the Rocky Mountain Microcredit Conference, for organizations and individuals interested in microenterprise and other development activities that benefited families.

In 2005, the conference was renamed the Economic Self-Reliance Conference to reflect the broader set of development innovations being researched and tracked by the ESR Center.

For more information about the BYU ESR Center, visit selfreliance.byu.edu.

Writer: Marissa Ballantyne

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