Skip to main content
Intellect

Early Christian writing topic for David M. Kennedy Center lecture March 19

"Writing Christian: Some Observations on the Identification of Early Christian Letters in Egypt" will be the topic presented by Lincoln H. Blumell, a visiting assistant professor Tulane University, on Thursday, March 19, at 11 a.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

Blumell’s research interest is ancient Christianity, and he will defend his dissertation, “Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus,” at the University of Toronto in June.

He has had a number of refereed publications, including “Reconsidering the Dates of Three Christian Letters” in Archiv für Papyrusforschung und verwandte Gebiete (2008), “Petition to a Beneficiarius from Late Third Century A.D. Oxyrhynchus” in Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik (2008) and the forthcoming “A Note on the Meaning of the Term MONOKTISTHS” Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik."

This lecture will be archived online. For more information on events sponsored by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies, see the calendar online at kennedy.byu.edu.

Writer: Brady Toone

blumelllh.jpg

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
July 28, 2021
A team of BYU biologists has been tracking dragonflies around the world, from Vietnam to the islands of Vanuatu. Their goal is to piece together the first-ever phylogenic tree of all 6,300 known species and their ancestors.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 27, 2021
Amy Jensen, associate dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communications, delivered Tuesday’s forum address. She spoke on why our bodies matter in today’s digital world. More specifically, she explained that being more intentional about how we use and where we place our bodies can help us grow and cultivate a deeper understanding of others.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 25, 2021
New research finds that children who engaged with princess culture were more likely to hold progressive views about women and subscribe less to attitudes of toxic masculinity.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=