Skip to main content
Intellect

Distinguished Faculty Lecturer to speak at BYU Forum

"Can Calculus Carry Nerve Signals?" Brigham Young University's Karl G. Maeser Distinguished Faculty Lecturer and professor of mathematics, Kening Lu, will answer that question in a university forum on Tuesday, Feb. 26, at 11:05 a.m. in the Marriott Center.

Lu is an internationally recognized expert in infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, a remarkably effective teacher and a conscientious citizen of the university, the broader community and his profession. His research interests include differential equations and stochastic dynamics, and his favorite course to teach is calculus.

Lu received his bachelor's and master's degrees in mathematics from Sichuan University in China in 1982 and 1985, respectively, and his doctorate in mathematics from Michigan State University in 1988. His doctoral research was in the area of infinite dimensional systems. He held postdoctoral positions at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Minnesota before joining the BYU faculty in 1990.

Writer: David Luker

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
February 23, 2021
Dr. Dambisa Moyo, a Zambian-born international economist who analyzes macroeconomics and global affairs, delivered Tuesday’s forum address. She spoke on the macroeconomic, geopolitical and social trends defining our world.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
February 23, 2021
Leaders of U.S. Special Operations Command have turned to the expertise of two Brigham Young University professors for advice on the high-stakes ethical dilemmas their forces face.


overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
February 12, 2021
The study found that fathers who had more sons were more likely to vote for a stronger national government than fathers of daughters, who preferred a weaker national government with greater state authority.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=