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Intellect

Discounts on products, services available for BYU employees

BYU has updated its online site for special discounts and offers designed exclusively for its faculty and staff. The site, found at byudiscounts.byu.edu, provides a way for various off-campus businesses to provide a valuable benefit to BYU employees in a non-intrusive way.

Follow the instructions on the website to learn how to obtain a discount. Only BYU employees, their spouses and their children may take advantage of the discounts.

Unless directed otherwise in the offer, the employee does not need to be present at the point of purchase as long as the BYU ID is displayed and the purchaser is identified as an immediate family member of the BYU employee.

Services are diverse and include cell phones, vehicles, flowers, Seven Peaks and more.  Businesses interested in offering a discount can go to the website and follow the instructions on how to submit an offer for consideration.

“Discounts are added regularly, so check back often,” says Adam Parker, BYU licensing and trademark manager.

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