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Intellect

Director of BYU's India Study Abroad to lecture March 17

M.V. Krishnayya, site director for Brigham Young University’s India Study Abroad program, will be the featured speaker at a lecture in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium Wednesday, March 17, at noon.

He will be speaking about “Martin Luther King and Mahatma Gandhi: The Legacies of Nonviolence.” The lecture will also be archived online at kennedy.byu.edu.

Krishnayya is a retired professor and chair in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at Andhra University in India. An expert in Buddhism and French existentialism, Krishnayya has also studied regional Hindu religious practices and village mythologies. Recently, he has written on Gandhi’s influence on King and on the nature of nonviolent political change.

Previously, he was a visiting professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Beloit College, Randolph-Macon College, the University of Alabama and Shelton State Community College.

For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

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