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Intellect

Couples, individuals sought for China teaching experience

The David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies at Brigham Young University is seeking applications from qualified couples and individuals to teach at universities in the People's Republic of China.

The program, entering its 14th year, has placed more than 500 people in the program teaching oral and written English. There is also a need for teachers of British and American literature, economics, business, finance and law. Chinese language skills are not required for placement.

Successful applicants must be active members of the Church in good standing, be age 69 or younger, have good health, have a secure financial situation and have a bachelor's degree or higher (minimum one per couple).

Because of housing limitations, couples with children are not accepted.

For more information or to receive an application call (801) 422-2389, or write to: China Teachers Program, David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies, 237 HRCB, Provo, UT 84602; e-mail to china-teach@email.byu.edu, or vist the Web site (http://kennedy.byu.edu/chinateachers.html).

Completed applications for the academic year 2003-04 must be received by Feb. 14, 2003.

Writer: Craig Kartchner

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