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Intellect

CORRECTION: Maxwell Institute hosts Dead Sea Scrolls lectures Jan. 12

The Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University will host an evening of lectures to coincide with the launch of the second issue of “Studies in the Bible and Antiquity” and the continuation of the Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library.  This free public event will be Wednesday, Jan. 12, at 7 p.m. in the Gordon B. Hinckley Alumni and Visitors Center.

A previously distributed calendar incorrectly listed the date for this event as Tuesday, Jan. 11.

Three brief presentations will be given by BYU professors Andrew Skinner, Donald Parry and Dana Pike, followed by a question-and-answer session. 

Summarizing the second issue of “Studies in the Bible and Antiquity,” Skinner will speak on the Dead Sea Scrolls and the world of Jesus, while Parry will focus on the biblical text of the scrolls. Pike will discuss a Latter-day Saint perspective, scholarship and recommendations for LDS use of the Dead Sea Scrolls. 

The Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library is a searchable database of the scrolls produced by the Maxwell Institute. This database contains all non-biblical scrolls that are transcribed and translated, all of which are electronically searchable.

Please see the maxwellinstitute.byu.edu for more details or contact Elin Roberts at (801) 422-7154.

Writer: Mel Gardner

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