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Intellect

Consul general to give "China Briefing" at BYU Jan. 5

Robert D. Griffiths, consul general with the Consulate General of the United States, will give a "China Briefing" Thursday, Jan. 5, at noon in 238 Herald R. Clark Building at Brigham Young University.

The lecture is hosted by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies, and admission is free.

Griffiths is a career member of the U.S. Foreign Service with overseas postings in Bogota, Colombia; Thailand; Kaohsiung and Taipei with the American Institute in Taiwan; and Shanghai and Beijing.

Most recently Griffiths served as senior course adviser at the Foreign Service Institute in Arlington, Va. In Washington, he has served in the Bureau of Economic Affairs and as deputy director for Mainland Southeast Asia in the Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs.

Fluent in Thai and Chinese, Griffiths received a bachelor's degree in Asian studies from BYU and a master’s degree in public policy from Harvard.

This lecture will be archived at kennedy.byu.edu/archive. For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652 or lee_simons@byu.edu.

Writer: Lee Simons

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