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Intellect

"Choose to Serve the Lord": Women’s Conference at BYU April 29-30

Women from across the United States and around the world will travel to Brigham Young University Thursday and Friday, April 29-30, for the annual BYU Women’s Conference. They will be attending instructional sessions and a service event during the conference, which is co-sponsored by the Relief Society of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

The theme for this year’s conference comes from Moses 6:33-34, “Choose ye this day to serve the Lord.” It will feature speakers such as Elder Dallin H. Oaks of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and members of the general presidencies of the Relief Society, Young Women and Primary.

“We begin and end the conference on both days with general sessions in the Marriott Center,” said conference chair Sandra Rogers, BYU International vice president. “It is an amazing experience to meet and sing together as we share sisterhood and camaraderie.”

Women and men ages 16 and older may register for the conference online at womensconference.byu.edu or by calling (801) 422-8925. In-person registration is also available weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Harman Continuing Education Building lobby at BYU.

There is same-day registration April 29 at the Marriott Center beginning at 7:30 a.m. The cost is $49 for the full conference or $29 for a single day. BYU faculty, staff and students with a BYU ID are eligible for a reduced registration price of $17 for the full conference or $10 for either Thursday or Friday. A BYU ID number will be required to complete the online or phone registration.

Each day will begin with a morning general session, followed by three breakout sessions at 11 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. and an afternoon general session at 3:45 p.m.

Thursday’s general session will begin with Julie B. Beck, general president of the Relief Society, in the morning session at 9 a.m., followed by Young Women General President Elaine S. Dalton and her counselors Mary N. Cook and Ann M. Dibb at 11 a.m. Renata Forste, professor and chair of the Department of Sociology, will be featured at the afternoon general session.

Friday’s opening session will feature Silvia H. Allred and Barbara Thompson, first and second counselors in the Relief Society general presidency, respectively. Members of the Primary general presidency will then address the conference at 11 a.m., and the Friday closing session will host Elder Dallin H. Oaks of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and his wife, Kristen M. Oaks.

“Between the two general sessions Thursday and Friday, attendees can choose from a selection of concurrent sessions presented in 16 venues around campus,” Rogers said. “More than 200 presenters will share their perspectives and insights on a variety of topics about the family, marriage, womanhood and sisterhood, gospel principles and practical and timely topics of interest and concern to women of all ages.”

As in previous years, the concurrent sessions will include special sections conducted in Spanish.

The theme for this year’s service portion of the conference is “Scatter Sunshine.” On Thursday at 8 a.m., there will be a “Take ‘n’ Make and Return” activity in the Marriott Center. Participants can take kits from the Marriott Center, make cancer ribbons, crochet mittens, scarves, slippers and other items and then return the completed items to the Wilkinson Student Center Garden Court.

The service activities will also include an “Evening of Service” Thursday in the Richards Building and Smith Fieldhouse from 5 to 8:30 p.m. There will be various service activities to “scatter sunshine” to those in need. “This combination of fun, practical ideas and service promises to be a highlight of Women’s Conference,” said Rogers.

In addition, “Sharing Stations,” which conference organizers call “a trade show of service ideas,” will feature more than 50 exhibitors in the Richards Building demonstrating service project ideas that conference-goers can take home with them to their wards and communities.

Those interested in on-campus housing for the event must be full-conference participants. There are different housing options available on the Women’s Conference Web site, ce.byu.edu/cw/womensconference/on_campus_housing.cfm. For off-campus housing, the Web site also has some listings at ce.byu.edu/cw/womensconference/off_campus_housing.cfm.

Parking is available in lots north and northeast of the Marriott Center. Overflow parking is also available in the southeast lot of Cougar stadium. There will be courtesy vans available for seniors and those with disabilities.

Delayed broadcasts of selected sessions will be shown Thursday and Friday, May 13-14, on BYUTV, KBYU-TV and byubroadcasting.org. For more information about rebroadcasting, visit byub.org.

For more information about Women’s Conference, visit womensconference.byu.edu or call (801) 422-7692.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

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