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Intellect

Choices in clothing are significant, says associate dean

Contrary to popular opinion, you can judge a book by its cover, at least when it comes to the clothing people wear, said Rory Scanlon, associate dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communications, at Tuesday's devotional in the Marriott Center.

"The clothing you choose to wear makes a strong statement about your attitude toward yourself and your society," Scanlon said.

As students and faculty members on campus, Scanlon said, the clothing we wear should reflect the values of BYU and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He encouraged men to keep their hair trimmed and their shoes clean, while warning women against wearing clothing that is too revealing or form-fitting.

"Truly, your honoring of the dress code adds to the educational and spiritual [community] of our unique university campus," Scanlon said. "The external expression of your testimony can help strengthen not only your own faith, but also that of each other member of this [community]."

Students' and faculty members' commitment to the university's Honor Code is "based in a unity of faith. It represents our commitment to a community in which we hope to grow in our knowledge of the Son of God," Scanlon said.

Scanlon explained that the clothes a person wears lend social status to the wearer and display the person's importance in the world. Because of this, the clothes we wear are largely determined by our "poli," a Greek word that referred to the close-knit society of the Greek world.

Scanlon encouraged students to reevaluate their social community and its influence on their clothing.

"Carefully select the poli with which you make allegiance, for its policies will greatly influence your personal development," Scanlon said.

Writer: Alexis Plowman

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