Skip to main content
Intellect

CANCELED: Best-selling author Doug Stanton to speak at BYU April 7

Books' screen rights optioned by Disney

Best-selling author and adventurer Doug Stanton will be speaking at Brigham Young University Wednesday, April 7, at noon in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

Stanton is the author of “In Harm’s Way: The Sinking of the USS Indianapolis and the Extraordinary Story of Its Survivors,” a New York Times bestseller. He most also recently published “Horse Soldiers,” the story of a small group of Special Forces soldiers who secretly entered Afghanistan shortly after 9/11. They went to war on horses against the Taliban, were outnumbered 40 to one and eventually captured the city of Mazar-i-Sharif. Both books have been acquired by Disney for screen rights.

He is also a contributing editor at “Men’s Journal” and writes on travel, sports, entertainment and history. Through his research he has nearly drowned in Cape Horn waters, survived a mugging by jungle revolutionaries, played basketball with George Clooney, been employed as a caretaker for Robert Frosts’ house in Vermont and taken an acting lesson from Harrison Ford.

Stanton received a master’s degree from the University of Iowa Writer’s Workshop and has also taught writing at the college level.

For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

stantond.jpg

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
July 27, 2021
Amy Jensen, associate dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communications, delivered Tuesday’s forum address. She spoke on why our bodies matter in today’s digital world. More specifically, she explained that being more intentional about how we use and where we place our bodies can help us grow and cultivate a deeper understanding of others.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 25, 2021
New research finds that children who engaged with princess culture were more likely to hold progressive views about women and subscribe less to attitudes of toxic masculinity.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 21, 2021
Immigrant communities such as a Finnish settlement in Scofield and a Chinese community in Salt Lake City may not be as well-known or remembered but still play an important part of Utah’s history — a history rich with diverse stories of faith and perseverance.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=