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Intellect

Canadian, U.S. legal systems topic of BYU Palmer Lecture Sept. 29

Charles E. Jones, recently retired Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Arizona, will present the annual Asael E. and Maydell C. Palmer Lecture, “Borders Do Count: Comparing and Contrasting the Canadian and U.S. Legal Systems,” Thursday, Sept. 29, at noon in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

Jones, as a Canadian native, will share his knowledge about the Canadian federal and provincial legal systems.

He served as an associate justice and chief justice of the Supreme Court of Arizona, as an associate and partner in the law firm of Jennings, Strouss and Salmon in Phoenix, and as a law clerk for Richard H. Chambers, chief judge of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Jones received his bachelor’s degree from BYU and his juris doctorate degree from the Stanford Law School. He was awarded the Alumni Distinguished Service Award from Brigham Young University, the Feuerstein Award from the University of Arizona and the University of Arizona Public Service Award.

The Asael E. and Maydell C. Palmer annual lecture series is sponsored by Canadian Studies and the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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