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Intellect

Campus community invited to free screening of film on Korean unification May 23

KBYU-TV, Channel 11, and the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies invites the campus community and their guests to a screening of a new film, "Unfortunate Brothers: Korea’s Unification Dilemma," Thursday, May 23, at 7 p.m. at the BYU Broadcasting Building.

There is no charge to attend; however because seating is limited, please register in advance at www.byutv.org/audience. A question-and-answer session with the filmmakers will follow the film. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be served.

The film was produced by Utah filmmaker Dodge Billingsley with the support of the David M. Kennedy Center and the Utah Humanities Council.

Unification of the Koreas is a complicated issue, not only for both the North and South, but for China, Japan and the United States as well. Changing opinions in South Korea, a generation gap, North Korean nuclear ambitions, and security concerns from the U.S, China and Japan all hinder potential unification.
 
Shot over the course of three years, "Unfortunate Brothers" explores these issues by following Mr. Lee, a North Korean defector trying to adjust to life in his newly adopted South Korean homeland. Through Mr. Lee's intensely personal account of his journey from North Korea, as well as expert interviews, the film unravels the riddle of Korean unification and promotes deeper understanding of two countries that are often not fully understood.

Writer: Diena Simmons

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