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Intellect

Cambodian ambassador to the United States at BYU lecture March 23

The David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies at Brigham Young University will host His Excellency Sereywath Ek, Cambodian ambassador to the United States, for a lecture Thursday, March 23, at 11 a.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

Admission is free and the public is welcome.

Ek received his appointment to be ambassador in March 2005 after years of distinguished service to the Kingdom of Cambodia, including postings as senator, ambassador to the Philippines, a member of Parliament for the Takeo Province constituency and secretary of state at the Ministry of National Defense.

In 1993, he also served as vice minister of information in the provisional government of Cambodia and a member of Parliament for the Phnom Penh constituency. In addition, he has held posts as deputy director and director of information for Funcipec, as editor of the Cambodia Center newsletter in Paris and as a journalist with “Le Figaro” in Paris.

Ek, who speaks French, English and Thai, received a master’s degree in political science from the Institute of Political Studies Diplomatic Section in Paris.

This lecture will be archived online. For more information on Kennedy Center events, visit kennedy.byu.edu.

Writer: Brian Rust

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