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BYUtv's "Granite Flats" to premiere season two April 6

The second season of “Granite Flats,” BYUtv’s first original scripted series, will debut Sunday, April 6, at 6 p.m. MST. The series aims to build on last year’s success, with guest stars Christopher Lloyd (Doc Brown in “Back to the Future”), Cary Elwes (Westley in “The Princess Bride”) and Finola Hughes (Anna Devane in “General Hospital”).

“Granite Flats” is the network’s first scripted series and has been a massive undertaking. Its debut last year marked a change of course as the station focuses less on BYU internally and more on reaching out to, and meeting the needs of, a national audience. With “Granite Flats,” BYUtv is trying to fill a decade-long void of this kind of programming – the type of show where the whole family can sit around the TV and enjoy together.

Set in 1962 America West at the height of the Cold War, the show is a suspenseful period drama with a twist of science fiction. “Granite Flats” tells the story of a recently widowed single mom, Beth Milligan, and her 12-year-old son, Arthur. The two move from California to the rural town of Granite Flats, Colo., to start a new life after the untimely and mysterious death of their Air Force pilot husband and father. From the moment of their arrival at the military base where Beth is employed as a hospital nurse and Arthur gets a post-tragedy restart on life, the wholesome community is quickly revealed to be much more complex than at first glance. Arthur and two equally-curious new friends form their own private investigation into the complexities.

In the second season, it’s one year later in Granite Flats and things are only getting more mysterious. The three children detectives stumble into dangerous evidence as Chief Sanders and the FBI look into the missing satellite. Old friends become enemies and unlikely alliances are born. Everyone is keeping a secret – or at least knows more than they're admitting.

Hour-long episodes of the show will air weekly on Sunday nights at 6 p.m. MST. See the first season on demand on BYUtv.org.

About BYUtv:

Currently, BYUtv is available in High Definition and is carried to more than 51 million homes on Dish Network, DirecTV and over 800 cable systems in every state via cable and satellite. All content is additionally available via Internet streaming at byutv.org. The non-commercial station’s reach is unprecedented for a university. BYUtv offers approximately 1,000 hours of original programming annually (500 hours of sports and 500 hours of content).

Writer: Brett Lee

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