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Intellect

BYU's Sundance Trio to close out Double Reed Round-up Sept. 17

The Sundance Trio featuring Brigham Young University School of Music faculty and the BYU Chamber Orchestra will finish out the Double Reed Round-up event at BYU Saturday, Sept. 17, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall. Admission is free.

The program will highlight classical works for double reed instruments by Johann Christian Bach and Joseph Haydn along with the more contemporary setting of six French songs by Willard S. Elliot.

The Sundance Trio consists of oboist Geralyn Giovannetti and bassoonist Christian Smith with pianist Jed Moss. The trio strives to perform and record new and unusual works by commissioning composers whose musical talents range from jazz to modern idioms.

Other BYU faculty performers to be featured in the concert include violinists Monte Belknap and Alex Woods, violist Claudine Bigelow, cellist Julie Bevan and bassist Eric Hansen.

For more information about this performance, contact Ken Crossley at (801) 422-9348 or ken_crossley@byu.edu.

Writer: Charles Krebs

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