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Intellect

BYU's Redd Center seeks nurses who trained, worked at Utah's religious-based hospitals

For oral history project

The Charles Redd Center for Western Studies at Brigham Young University is collecting oral histories and other information about nurses training and nurses at the religious-based hospitals in Utah.

The center plans to interview women who trained at the hospitals and worked there. Until the 1950s, most nurses were trained in hospitals. Gradually those programs have shifted to colleges and universities.

"We want to know, 'What was it like to receive training at this type of hospital? Once graduated, what was it like working at these facilities?' Salt Lake City and Utah provide an interesting case study," says Jesse Embry of BYU's Redd Center.

Holy Cross was the only religious-based hospital that continued to offer a three-year registered nurse program as late as 1973. Other religious hospitals in the state included St. Marks and the LDS Hospital system.

For information on how to participate contact Jessie Embry at jle3@email.byu.edu or (801) 422-7585.

Writer: James McCoy

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