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Intellect

BYU's A. Lee Swindlehurst named fellow of national engineering society

A. Lee Swindlehurst, chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Brigham Young University, was recently named a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers for his contributions to the field of space-time signal processing for radar and wireless communications.

Swindlehurst is the first IEEE Fellow in the 50-year history of the department. For 2004, only 260 people worldwide were named Fellows from a total membership of approximately 400,000. This represents a percentage of less than 1/10th of one percent of the engineers who belong to the institute.

He received his bachelor's and master's degrees from BYU and earned a doctorate degree from Stanford University in 1991. He returned to teach at BYU in 1990 and was named the Chair of the department in 2003. Swindlehurst worked as a visiting scholar in Sweden during the 1996-97 academic year, where he held a joint appointment at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm and Uppsala University in Uppsala.

Swindlehurst is a recognized expert in the field of signal processing and wireless communications, has more than 125 publications in these areas and has received $2.5 million in funding from government and industrial sources to sponsor his research.

He is the secretary of the IEEE Signal Processing Society, is a member of the Sensor Array and Multichannel Signal Processing Technical Committee of the same society. He is also a recipient of the 2000 IEEE W. R. G. Baker Prize Paper Award and is co-author of a paper that received the IEEE Signal Processing Society Young Author Best Paper Award in 2001.

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