Skip to main content
Intellect

BYU's Lee Library “tunes in” to student requests

Just in time for the holidays, those who enjoy studying to music can gather at the south end of the Harold B. Lee Library second floor in the new music study area.

The Lee Library set up the music study area at the request of students who submitted the idea to the Student Advisory Council Bright Ideas Web site. Library administrators chose the south end of the second floor because it is not near any reference desks, and it has enough study tables to accommodate those who like the musical study atmosphere.

“We didn’t want to take over anyone’s favorite quiet corner, so after looking at many different areas, we decided that the second floor would be the best,” said Joe Hardie, president of the Library Student Advisory Council.

One week’s worth of music will play softly in a random order so students will not repeatedly hear the same songs. Usually the music will be classical, but during December selections will include holiday favorites.

“It took awhile for the speakers and wiring to be installed, but it is exciting that we were able to help implement other students’ ideas in the library,” Hardie said.

Student ideas also prompted the library to set up a Facebook page. Library patrons can now become fans of the Harold B. Lee Library on Facebook, and can visit the page for updates about library news and events.

Any other ideas or requests for the library can be submitted at http://brightideas.byu.edu. All ideas will be reviewed by the student council.

The library has also launched a beta version of a new Web site, which includes a next-generation search engine, ScholarSearch. This new search tool allows students to find scholarly material that they will not find through Google or other search tools.

Additional ScholarSearch features include:

• Most relevant items listed first

• Filters to help narrow the search

• Real-time availability information

• Table-of-contents details

• User reviews and tagging

• Save citations or search statements

ScholarSearch is a functional beta, but it is still under development. Patrons can use it and submit their feedback to the library.

For more information, contact Roger Layton, Harold B. Lee Library communications manager, at (801) 422-6687 or roger_layton@byu.edu, or Joe Hardie, Library Student Advisory Council president, at (801) 699-8180 or allamerican04@hotmail.com.

Writer: April Chalk

Related Articles

data-content-type="article"

BYU engineers travel to the Arctic, develop innovative radar method to detect polar bears

May 25, 2022
BYU engineering students are testing radar to track polar bears aboveground. If successful, the team’s work would mark a significant step forward in scientists’ ability to track mother polar bears during winter, when they den and give birth to their cubs beneath dense snowpack. Locating and protecting bear dens is important for conservation efforts.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

Forum: It is a dangerous business, going into the laboratory

May 24, 2022
Dr. Paul B. Savage, the recipient of the 2021 Karl G. Maeser Distinguished Faculty Lecturer Award and professor of chemistry and biochemistry, delivered the forum to campus on Tuesday. He discussed some of the adventures and experiences he has had as a professor and researcher, and the concept that Heavenly Father has a great academic adventure planned for all of us.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

Going cashless to prevent COVID-19 was useless, new BYU microbiology study finds

May 12, 2022
A new study published in PLOS ONE from BYU scientists finds that the SARS-CoV-2 virus is almost immediately nonviable if deposited on a cash banknote. The virus actually shows greater stability on plastic money cards, with the live virus still being detected 48 hours after initial deposition, but no viable virus was detected on either cash or card that was randomly sampled in the study.


overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=