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Intellect

BYU's Kennedy Center names first Kennedy Scholars

The David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies at Brigham Young University has announced the first ten recipients of its Kennedy Scholar awards.

The Kennedy Scholars award is open to all full-time BYU students who embody the aims of the Kennedy Center. Emphasis is placed on those students who have an international or global focus, which can be demonstrated through majors, minors, participation in Kennedy Center programs, theses, research projects and internships.

This year’s Kennedy Scholars are:

  • Ryan F. Balli, a Middle Eastern Studies/Arabic major from Littleton, Colo.

  • James F. Dickinson, a Latin American studies major with minors in business and computer science from Tigard, Ore.

  • Kent E. Freeze, a political science major with minors in economics and Chinese studies from Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

  • Christopher M. Pélissié, a finance major from Provo, Utah.

  • Paul Picard, majoring in international relations from Talence, France.

  • Dustin Roses, a political science major with an international relations emphasis from Mulino, Ore.

  • Laura Scott, a senior in physiology and developmental biology from Benicia, Calif.

  • Anne Sidwell, an international relations major with a Spanish minor from Modesto, Calif.

  • Jay Stirling, an international studies major with a French minor from Weston, Mass.

  • Tyler Woolstenhulme, a Latin American studies major with a minor in business management from Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Kennedy Center received more than 60 applications and plans to administer these awards of part- to full-time tuition stipends for two semesters every year. For more information on the scholarship, visit kennedy.byu.edu/student/scholarships.php.

    Writer: Angela Fischer

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