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Intellect

BYU's Bean Museum names insect collection after two researchers

The Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum at Brigham Young University recently named its extensive entomology (insect) collection for two BYU emeritus professors, Richard W. Baumann and Stephen L. Wood.

Over the course of his career, Baumann published more than 100 scientific articles. Much of his research has focused on stoneflies, making him a leading authority on this group. Under his supervision, BYU’s Plecoptera collection has become the largest and most important in the world.

Wood published more than 110 peer-reviewed scientific articles. His work with bark beetles received worldwide recognition. In 2008 he published a 900-page monograph on South American bark beetles, an invaluable contribution to the bark beetle research community. His collection of insects is now housed at the Smithsonian Institution.

The BYU entomology collection contains more than 1.5 million preserved insect and other arthropod specimens. The insects are preserved on pins, in vials and in ultra-low freezers for DNA research. The collection includes specimens from all over the world with an emphasis on insects collected in Utah and the western United States.

Admission to all museum exhibits is free. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday. The museum is closed Sunday.

For more information, contact Patty Jones at the Bean Museum, (801) 422-5053.

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