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Intellect

BYU will again host popular Passover Seder Services

Ticket sales begin Feb. 16

Brigham Young University will hold its annual Passover Seder Services March 26 and 27 and April 1, 7, 10, 15 and 23. All events, except the April 1 service, will take place in 3228 Wilkinson Student Center. The April 1 service will be in 3220 WSC. All services will begin at 6:30 p.m. and typically run until 10 p.m.

Tickets will go on sale Tuesday, Feb. 16, in 271 Joseph Smith Building. Tickets are $25 for the general public or $17 for BYU students, faculty and staff. All tickets must be purchased at least four days before the service date. The service will include the unleavened bread, the bitter herbs and other traditions of Passover. A catered meal and commentary will be provided.

Victor L. Ludlow, a BYU ancient scripture professor, has conducting these services for nearly 40 years. Ludlow is a scholar of Isaiah and Judaism. He graduated with high honors from BYU and was a Danforth Fellow at Harvard and Brandeis Universities, where he received a Ph.D. in Near Eastern and Judaic studies.

He has authored many articles and books including “Unlocking the Old Testament,” “Isaiah: Prophet, Seer, and Poet,” “Principles and Practices of the Restored Gospel” and “Unlocking Isaiah in the Book of Mormon.” His most recent audio lecture is “Latter-day Insights: The Middle East.”

In addition, Ludlow will be holding a Passover Seder Service Workshop Saturday, Feb. 27, at 10 a.m. in 3228 WSC. The workshop will provide ideas and suggestions for individuals interested in teaching or conducting Passover services. Tickets for this event are also available Feb. 16 in 271 JSB. Tickets are $15 and include a packet of material and a luncheon.

For more information, call the Passover information line at (801) 422-8325.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

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