Skip to main content
Intellect

BYU University Accessibility Center plans open house Dec. 3

The University Accessibility Center at Brigham Young University welcomes students, faculty and staff to an open house Wednesday, Dec. 3, in its new office, 2170 Wilkinson Student Center, behind the Cougareat food court.

Students are invited to attend between 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. to learn about services that can help students with disabilities achieve academic success. Students without disability concerns can also learn about participation in volunteer programs available at the UAC. Homemade root beer floats will be served.

A special invitation is extended to all full-time employees (faculty, administration, and staff) to attend from 2 to 4 p.m. to learn how they can best help students with disabilities. Hot dogs from J-Dawgs will be served.

“I fear that many students here at BYU think that since they don’t have a physical disability, they don’t qualify for help,” said Michael Brooks, University Accessibility Center director. “We’re here to help students with learning disabilities, emotional disorders and chronic pain, among other conditions, not just those with hearing, vision or mobility problems.”

Student volunteers are urgently needed in many volunteer roles, including note takers and test scribes. Note takers take detailed notes in classes already on their schedules, simply sharing their notes. Test scribes write down test answers as they’re dictated by a student with a disability.

The University Accessibility Center serves BYU students who have physical, learning, emotional or chronic health disabilities by providing equal access to educational opportunities and eliminating barriers that could limit participation in academic pursuits.

For more information, contact Michael Brooks, University Accessibility Center director, at (801) 422-6020 or michael_brooks@byu.edu, or visit the UAC online at uac.byu.edu.

Writer: Brady Toone

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
October 14, 2020
Catastrophic fires in the West are burning hotter than ever, leaving paths of destruction through both human development and native plant ecosystems. Seed coating technology from BYU is helping restore native plant systems.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
October 13, 2020
A new BYU study, published in the journal Vaccines, shows that 68% of respondents are supportive of being vaccinated for COVID-19, but concerns remain about side effects, sufficient vaccine testing and vaccine effectiveness.


overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
October 08, 2020
Water modeling software created by BYU researchers can predict the rise and fall of every river on the face of the planet. Those streamflow forecasts are now being made available to agencies worldwide to deal with water emergencies.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=