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Intellect

BYU Track Team seeks officials for certification clinic Nov. 12

The BYU Track Team is need of officials for upcoming track meets. Individuals who have participated in track or have an interest in helping with track meets are invited to attend an officials certification clinic Thursday, Nov. 12, at 7 p.m. on the second level of Legend's Grill in the Student Athlete Building. The clinic will include a special snack prepared by Chef Wayne Griffin.

"We need responsible, conscientious individuals 14 years of age and older," said Doug Padilla of the BYU Track Office. "The certification process is simple and is a group activity. Dues are inexpensive and cover a full Olymipiad, or four years."

Track officials receive a small stipend for working at most meets, Padilla said. "We host two indoor track meets and four outdoor track meets each year, including the high school state meet and the BYU Invitational, which will celebrate its 100th year in 2010."

Participants may work some or all of the meets. For additional information, contact Doug Padilla in the Track Office, (801) 422-1295.

Writer: Doug Padilla

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