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Intellect

BYU Studies book enhances state heritage appreciation

From living in a dugout to eating so many weeds their skin took on a green cast to losing four children in just a few weeks due to diphtheria, nearly everything imaginable happened to the Latter-day Saint settlers of Utah Territory. A new book from BYU Studies aptly illustrates their struggles.

"Nearly Everything Imaginable: The Everyday Life of Utah's Mormon Pioneers" details the lives of common settlers--what they ate, wore, lived in, celebrated, worshipped and endured.

This BYU Press publication enhances appreciation for the struggles and accomplishments of our early pioneer heritage. "Nearly Everything Imaginable," edited by Ronald W. Walker and Doris R. Dant, also gives a unique perspective on details of pioneer history that are rarely researched or discussed in traditional histories, such as what they ate and the animal and plant life around them.

For more information on ordering this and other publications from BYU Studies, please visit the Web site at *~*http://byustudies.byu.edu*~*.

"Nearly Everything Imaginable" includes hundreds of vignettes from Utah's early settlers. Articles include "Dancing the Buckles off Their Shoes," "I Have Eaten Nearly Everything Imaginable: Pioneer Diet" and "Heigh, Ho! I'm Seventeen: The Diary of a Teenage Girl."

"For this year's celebration of Pioneer Day on July 24, add the award-winning contents of 'Nearly Everything Imaginable' to your celebrations and expand your knowledge of Utah's nineteenth-century heritage," said Janeal Thornock of BYU Studies. "This publication will make a great addition to any home library and will bring new perspectives to the study of Utah history."

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