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Intellect

BYU student history association hosts Supreme Court panel discussion Sept. 22

The Brigham Young University Phi Alpha Theta History Honors Association will present a panel discussion on the historical context for partisan fights over Supreme Court nomination Thursday, Sept. 22, at 7 p.m., in W111 Ezra Taft Benson Building.

Admission is free and all are invited to attend.

The panelists will include Neil York, history professor and expert in the Founding era; Andrew Johns, history professor and expert in 20th-century U.S. political history; and Richard Davis, professor of political science, who wrote a book about how the Supreme Court justices should be elected.

The BYU History Department’s Beta Iota Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, which is hosting the panel, also received the Best Chapter award this month from its national association.

This marks the fourth year BYU’s chapter has won best chapter in their division, which is the largest category. The national association presented the award based on the quality of activities and level of participation.

For more information about the Phi Alpha Theta History honors association or the Supreme Court panel activity, please contact Matt Mason at (801) 422-3408.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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