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Intellect

BYU School of Music hosts recitals Oct. 28, 30

The Brigham Young University School of Music will host two solo concerts featuring guest artist Oscar Ruiz and faculty artist Claudine Bigelow, Tuesday, Oct. 28, and Thursday, Oct. 30, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center.

Admission to the events is free and all are welcome to attend.

Tuesday’s concert will feature Ruiz’s clarinet performance of music from Spain, accompanied by pianist Jeffrey Shumway. The program for his recital will feature two Spanish folklore dances, including “Zortziko” from the North of Spain by Pablo de Sarasate and “Habanera” by Maurice Ravel.

Ruiz has performed as a soloist with the St. Petersburg State Academic Symphony, St. Petersburg Chamber Philharmonic, Orquesta Sinfónica de la Ciudad de Asunción and Bilbao Symphony. He has also presented recitals at Carnegie’s Weill Hall in New York, the Corcoran Museum in Washington, D.C., the Pushkin Museum in Moscow, Oji Hall in Tokyo and the Madrid Royal Superior Conservatory.

He has a doctorate in musical arts from Stony Brook University and a master’s degree in fine arts from the Purchase College Conservatory of Music.

Thursday’s concert will feature faculty artist Claudine Bigelow on the viola. She will perform “Deux Rapsodies” by Charles Martin Loeffler, an American Impressionism piece written to poetry. She will be accompanied by BYU faculty members Scott Holden and Geralyn Giovannetti.

She will also premiere a piece by BYU faculty member Michael Hicks, the Trio Sonata for Viola, Piano and Toy Piano. Her performance will conclude with Debussy’s French Impressionistic piece, the Sonata for Flute, Viola and Harp, accompanied by faculty member April Clayton and Utah Symphony harpist Lysa Rytting.

For more information, contact Ken Crossley at (801) 422-9348.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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