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Intellect

BYU School of Music hosts "Crosstalk," an evening of new music, Feb. 11

Featuring works by students from BYU, University of Utah

Brigham Young University School of Music’s Electronic Music Studio will host “Crosstalk,” an evening of new music featuring students and faculty from BYU and the University of Utah, Saturday, Feb. 11, at 5:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

Admission is free and the public is invited to attend.

Exploring the movement of sound in space, this electronic music concert will highlight works from 10 student composers from both universities.

The music performed will be electronically generated using computer programs and software to record and manipulate sounds with synthesizers. Many pieces will be pre-recorded and will be played through speakers. Some works will involve live performers on the electronic synthesizer playing along with pre-recorded sounds.

“This is basically a performer-less recital,” said director Steve Ricks. “It’s like transforming the recital hall into a living room where we’ll all sit back and listen to the electronic recording played back in concert style.”

Another unique aspect of this performance is the projection of video and visual images accompanying the music, creating a multimedia environment.

For more information, contact Steve Ricks at (801) 422-6115

Writer: Angela Fischer

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