Skip to main content
Intellect

BYU releases new book “Legacy of Sacrifice: Missionaries to Scandinavia, 1872-1894”

In honor of the sacrifice and commitment of 19th-century Scandinavian missionaries of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Brigham Young University Religious Studies Center recently released a new volume of biographies titled “Legacy of Sacrifice: Missionaries to Scandinavia, 1872-1894.”

Assembled by Susan Easton Black, Shauna C. Anderson and Ruth Ellen Maness, the book uses short biographies to identify and acknowledge the missionaries who dedicated themselves to bringing the gospel of Jesus Christ to Scandinavia.

The book can be used as a family history resource as well, as the volume contains specific, carefully researched information on each missionary. Other features include explanations of Scandinavian surnames, a pronunciation guide and photos.

The book also discusses the sacrifices made by Scandinavian converts to the Church of Jesus Christ, many of whom were disowned or gave up all their possessions.

For more information, contact Susan Easton Black at (801) 422-6418.

Writer: Stephanie H. Wilson

Legacy-of-Sacrifice-cov.jpg

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
July 28, 2021
A team of BYU biologists has been tracking dragonflies around the world, from Vietnam to the islands of Vanuatu. Their goal is to piece together the first-ever phylogenic tree of all 6,300 known species and their ancestors.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 27, 2021
Amy Jensen, associate dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communications, delivered Tuesday’s forum address. She spoke on why our bodies matter in today’s digital world. More specifically, she explained that being more intentional about how we use and where we place our bodies can help us grow and cultivate a deeper understanding of others.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 25, 2021
New research finds that children who engaged with princess culture were more likely to hold progressive views about women and subscribe less to attitudes of toxic masculinity.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=