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Intellect

BYU public health students take first place in national competition

A group of undergraduate public health students from Brigham Young University has won first place at the Society of Public Health Education’s Undergraduate Case Study Competition that took place March 19-20, in Baltimore, Maryland.

BYU’s Dwight Bellingham, Faith Gomaric and Jessica Hill won the competition with their presentation on suicide prevention in public health.

The student team was one of eight finalists selected to compete in the competition, earning their way through a competitive screening process. The winning students, all seniors graduating in April, received their topic only days before the competition and could not be coached by faculty.

“These students deserve much credit for the success that has been given to the university,” said Michael Barnes, Health Science chair. “We could not be more pleased to see how BYU public health students compete at the national level. Their success in tackling this challenging social issue is noteworthy. Their accomplishment is a reflection of the overall quality of students studying the world of public health at BYU at the side of quality faculty and staff.”

Writer: Brett Lee

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