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Intellect

BYU plans conference addressing eating disorders Feb. 25

Women’s Services and Resources at Brigham Young University will host an eating disorders awareness conference Feb. 25 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in 3228 Wilkinson Student Center in conjunction with Eating Disorders Awareness Week, Feb. 23-27, on the BYU campus.

The conference theme is “What Every Body Needs.” The public is invited to attend this free event.

The goals of the conference are to heighten awareness of eating disorders as well as to strengthen listeners individually through education and reflection on different aspects of a well-rounded life.

Six lectures or discussions will focus on self-acceptance, relationships and physical and spiritual health.

Lecturers and events at the conference include:

  • 10 a.m., Randy Hardmann, corporate vice president of the Center for Change in Orem, “Listening to the Heart.” Hardmann earned his doctorate degree in counseling psychology from BYU in 1984.

  • 11 a.m., Kip Rasmussen, therapist for the Center for Change in Orem, “The Magic of Allowing Imperfection: Understanding Relationships and Eating Disorders.”

  • Noon, Steve Hawks, associate professor of health science at BYU, “Making Peace With the Image in the Mirror.”

  • 1 p.m., Susan Fullmer, assistant teaching professor of nutrition, dietetics and food science at BYU, “Knowing Your Body: Eating, Exercise and Physical Health.”

  • 2 p.m., LaNae Valentine, director of Women’s Services and Resources at BYU, “Body Image and the Media: Worshipping Illusions.”

  • 3 p.m., A panel of survivors will discuss “How to Talk To, Support and Help Someone with an Eating Disorder.” Also part of the conference will be a walk-through display of art and poetry in 3250 Wilkinson Student Center as a memorial to survivors of eating disorders. The display will last from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the day of the conference.

    For more information, contact Elizabeth Rotz at (801) 422-6222 or ejr22@email.byu.edu.

    Writer: Thomas Grover

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