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Intellect

BYU Philharmonic to perform Mahler's 5th Symphony Feb. 27

Brigham Young University’s Philharmonic Orchestra, under the direction of Kory Katseanes, will present a concert Saturday, Feb. 27, at 7:30 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

Tickets are $11, $10 or $8 with BYU or student ID and can be purchased online at byuarts.com, by phone at (801) 422-4322 or in person at the Harris Fine Arts Center Ticket Office.

The orchestra will perform the Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor by Gustav Mahler, one of the leading orchestral and operatic conductors of his time.

“Mahler was absolutely brilliant as a builder of operatic success,” said Katseanes. “The symphony is one of his most pure, non-programmatic works. It does nonetheless, follow the same emotional path his life had taken during the two years of its conception.”

Katseanes will provide an introduction to the Mahler’s Symphony, discussing key events in Mahler’s life that influenced this musical creation.

The orchestra includes approximately 95 of the university’s finest student musicians, who come from all over the world to pursue both undergraduate and graduate degrees in music performance.

For more information, contact Kory Katseanes at (801) 422-3331.

Writer: Ricardo Castro

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