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Intellect

BYU Philharmonic Orchestra plans Feb. 10 concert

The Brigham Young University Philharmonic Orchestra, under the direction of Kory Katseanes, will perform Brahms’ Symphony No. 2, Debussy’s “Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun” and Georg Druschetzky’s Concerto for Oboe and Tympani featuring faculty artists Geralyn Giovannetti and Ronald Brough Tuesday, Feb. 10, at 7:30 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center.

Tickets are $11, or $8 with BYU or student ID, and may be purchased online at www.byuarts.com, by phone at (801) 422-4322 or in person at the Harris Fine Arts Center Ticket Office.

"One of the many contemporaries of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven, Georg Druschetzky is becoming better known in recent years through several publications and recordings of his music," said BYU School of Music faculty member Harrison Powley, who discovered and edited the concerto featured in the BYU performance.

"A tour de force for the timpanist and oboist, the concerto seems to have been written in the late 1790s and survives only in an undated set of parts. Druschetzky, trained as both a timpanist and oboist, may have played either of the solo parts himself," said Powley.

For more information, contact Kory Katseanes at (801) 422-3331.

Writer: Camille Metcalf

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