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Intellect

BYU offers new, improved aerobics class schedule

This semester the BYU Aerobic Fitness Program (formerly Intramural Aerobics) is new, improved and open to all members of the BYU community. With improved class offerings, broadened availability and increased advertising efforts, program directors are hoping to reach all those who are interested in being fit, but who may not realize this program is for them.

All full- and part-time faculty and staff, full- and part-time students, spouses and dependents are invited to join. Additionally, all BYU ward members or students with a college ID (including UVSC) may participate. Any others from the community are welcome after paying a $5 fee.

Barbara Neal, aerobics director and an instructor at BYU for the past 18 years, is excited about this semester's improvements. The program is designed to involve women, as well as men, of all ages and fitness levels.

Classes include yoga, step aerobics and kickboxing, shallow and deep water aerobics and powertone (aerobic training with weights and resistance bands). Prices range from $10 to $35 per semester, less than most gym memberships. Participants may also purchase a Personal Combo Pass for $50, which allows them to choose their favorite five classes per week as a personal fitness routine. Full class offerings, times and prices are available at the Web site (http://aerobics.byu.edu).

Register for classes at the Richards Building information window (112 RB) from 6 a.m. to 9:45 p.m. using cash, check or Signature Card. Please note that these are recreation classes, not for credit, but for personal fitness. All classes begin on Monday, Sept. 8, and end on Thursday, Dec. 11. For more information, visit the Web site (http://aerobics.byu.edu), call ext. 2-3644 or visit 112 RB.

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